let's talk farm animals

Long weekends make good hay

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Guest blog by Jeanine Moyer 

Baling hay, combining grain and harvesting corn – that’s what our family does to celebrate long weekends in the summer. And we enjoy every minute of it.

It always seems that the weather cooperates on long summer weekends – good for vacationers and farmers. And the long weekends provided an extra day, allowing us to get some of the most important seasonal jobs done on the farm and extra help around the farm.

A close up of hay

On our beef farm, we cut, or harvest, hay twice a year while some neighbouring dairy farms often cut three times a season. Hay is a mixture of grasses and alfalfa – providing essential nutrients and roughages (grasses) that are important to the digestive system of cattle. Hay grows like grass; it will grow back after you cut it making it easy for farmers to get multiple cuts of hay in a season.

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Posted by Farm and Food Care on July 25th, 2012 :: Filed under Beef cattle,Farm life,Summer,Uncategorized
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In Defense of Milk

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Guest blog:  Sarah Hubbart is the communications director for the Animal Agriculture Alliance.

 

Popular food writer Mark Bittman penned a 900-word diatribe against milk – of all things! – over the weekend for the New York Times.

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Posted by FFC on July 23rd, 2012 :: Filed under Activism,Food,milk,Vegan
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In the face of crisis

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By Jeanine Moyer

Living on a farm means we live farther away from our neighbours than most people. Instead of lawns and fences separating our house from the neighbour’s we have fields and streams. Sometimes I think the distance between each farm can make the relationship between neighbours stronger. And tests the strength of a relationship like an illness or disaster when neighbours come together to face adversity.

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Posted by Farm and Food Care on July 19th, 2012 :: Filed under animal handling,Barn fires,Barns,Family vs factory farming,Farm life,Sustainability of the family farm
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Farming for six generations - or more

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By Patricia Grotenhuis

I’ve always known farming is in my blood.  Recently, I found out how far it goes in my bloodline is while my parents were going through the family tree.

In two lines of the family tree, one from Mom’s side and one from Dad’s side, I am the sixth consecutive generation of Canadian farmers.  In all likelihood, if you were to go back further into my family history and look at what type of work my ancestors did before coming to Canada, my family’s farming history could go back even further. 

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Posted by Farm and Food Care on July 12th, 2012 :: Filed under Canada,careers,Family vs factory farming,Farm life,Feeding the world,Future of Farming
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Meet the chicken farmer who is Mr. July

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Meet the chicken farmer who is Mr. July

Wim Duizer 2012 Faces of Farming calendar

by Patricia Grotenhuis

Land availability and farming opportunities beckoned to Wim Duizer, a former dairy farmer, when he and his family left their native Holland for Canada in 2003.  Now he is running his broiler chicken (meat chicken) farm and becoming involved in his new community.

Duizer now farms in the Woodstock area with his wife Caren and their three young children.  His brothers, sister, and father are also farming in the area.  Duizer is one of the farmers featured in the 2012 Faces of Farming calendar published by the Farm Care Foundation. His page is sponsored by Maple Leaf Foods.

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Posted by Farm and Food Care on July 5th, 2012 :: Filed under Agricultural Advocates,Animal care,animal handling,Animal health,Chickens,Faces of Farming,Farm life,Uncategorized
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